COVID-19 safety for our company and your family

 
 

Radon Done is committed to the safety of your family and our own employees. During this pandemic, it is critical that we all observe safety protocols that minimize the risk of disease transmission.

What is COVID-19?

COVID-19 is a respiratory disease caused by a virus that is spreading worldwide and poses a serious public health threat. It has affected both healthy individuals and people already battling illness, including those with chronic medical conditions. The results of contracting COVID-19 have ranged from a temporary flu-like illness from which people have recovered, to life-threatening conditions and death. It can can be spread through person-to-person contact, through droplets in the air, and from touching surfaces where contamination has been deposited (the virus can live up to three days on non-porous surfaces).  

The virus is thought to spread mainly from person to person: 

  • between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet); and
  • through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. 

According to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, can pose an infection risk depending on the following methods of transmission and the virus’s lifespan:

  • aerosol (transmitted through the air):  3 hours;
  • copper surfaces:  4 hours;
  • cardboard surfaces:  24 hours; and
  • plastic and stainless-steel surfaces:  72 hours.

However, these timelines and methods may vary based on ambient temperature and relative humidity. More studies still need to be conducted. 

Radon testing is an essential service

Radon testers provide an essential service because they ensure people’s health and safety in the home by inspecting for hazards. This means that we must take extra precautions, not only for our own health and safety, but also for everyone we encounter during the course of business.

What are the Radon Done safety procedures?

Personal protective equipment (face masks) will be worn by all radon testers.

Personal hygiene

  • Wear a mask at all times that covers nose and mouth.
  • Wash hands with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds, and use alcohol-based hand sanitizer frequently, especially after touching surfaces.

Social distancing

  • Stay at least six feet away from all other people during inspections.
  • Request clients to wear a face covering if they remain in the building for the inspection.
  • Ask clients and occupants to leave the house for the radon test set-up and pack-up periods. Radon. test set-up generally requires 20 minutes, and pack-up requires about 10 minutes. Radon testing devices are placed in the lowest occupy-able area of the home, usually the basement.
  • Execute and transmit all inspection-related documents electronically. 
  • Use live video chat or FaceTime for follow up questions instead of meeting in-person.

Equipment cleaning procedure

Clean and disinfect frequently used items and surfaces daily, including:

  • Office surfaces, including doorknobs, desk drawer and cabinet handles, office equipment, desktop computer, and desk phone
  • Personal electronic devices, including cell phone, laptop, tablet, and cameras
  • Work vehicle 
  • Inspection tools and equipment

Safety first!

If we all follow the above procedures, we can successfully reduce the spread of COVID-19.

All radon inspectors who enter your home wear face coverings and use hand sanitizer.

All radon inspectors who enter your home wear face coverings and use hand sanitizer.

 
 

Any home can have high radon, the only way to know is to test.

Include a radon test with your home inspection for any house you consider buying.

Schedule a Radon Test Now for $150 What is Radon Gas?
 
 
 

Radon Information

Uranium emitting alpha particles in a cloud chamber

What is radon gas?


Radon is an odorless, colorless, tasteless, radioactive gas. Radon comes from the decay of radioactive uranium that can be found in small amounts in rocks and soil throughout nature. In areas with disturbed earth, and loose fill, like when a home is built, radon escapes from the soil.

Radon gas exposure is the number one cause of cancer for non-smokers, even greater than second-hand smoke. Most people are exposed to radon gas inside their own homes, and this is their greatest exposure to natural ionizing radiation.

Learn More

All radon inspectors who enter your home wear face coverings and use hand sanitizer.

COVID-19 safety for our company and your family

Radon Done is committed to the safety of your family and our own employees. During this pandemic, it is critical that we all observe safety protocols that minimize the risk of disease transmission.

Learn More

Radon Done radon test in progress door hanger. Homes undergoing radon testing must have all windows and doors closed for the duration of the test

Radon gas in Ohio

Central Ohio has relatively high natural concentrations of uranium from glacial deposits and shale, which during radioactive decay, produces radium and radon.

The EPA’s current radon action level is four picocuries of radon per liter of air (4 pCi/L). Most counties in central Ohio have high potential for radon, with predicted average indoor greater than the EPA action level. According to one study cited by Ohio Department of Natural Resources Department of Geological Survey, 38% of Ohio’s 88 counties had average indoor radon levels above 4.0 pCi/L, but Licking County’s average was above 8.0 pCi/L. Seven Ohio counties—Carroll, Fairfield, Franklin, Harrison, Knox, Pickaway, and Ross—had average indoor Radon concentrations between 6 and 8 pCi/L.

Learn More

How does radon get into my home?

Radon is odorless, colorless, and tasteless; it is an inert noble gas. Radon is a naturally-occurring, carcinogenic, radioactive gas produced by the decay of radium in the soil. Radon gas exposure is the greatest single source of natural, ionizing, background radiation, only surpassed by medical radiation.

Learn More